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How to Drink Like a President

How to Drink Like a President


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Beer: George Washington, John Adams, and Grover Cleveland

All three of these commanders in chief were said to have been hopheads. Washington favored English-style porter (apparently it was brewed quite frequently at Mount Vernon), but the honor of biggest presidential beer geek goes to John Adams, whose wife made a mean hard cider and who allegedly started regularly drinking beer for breakfast at age 15. (Don’t worry, folks, the drink had a much lower alcohol percentage back then.)

Wine: Thomas Jefferson, Chester A. Arthur

Chester A. Arthur was said to be a big fan of wine, and was known to drink it nightly. In fact, supposedly his Saturday nights were so intense he would need a carriage to take him to church Sunday morning… a block away. Of course, no conversation about presidents and wine would be complete without mention of Thomas Jefferson. The former president had a lifelong fascination with the art of producing wine, and was known as the first distinguished viticulturist in the United States. He set up his own vineyards at Monticello and spent his life studying the production of wine, among his many other hobbies.

Whiskey: Martin Van Buren, James Buchanan, Harry Truman

There appears to be an impressive collection of whiskey-drinking presidents. Van Buren allegedly earned the nickname Blue Whiskey Van for his impressive ability to hold his liquor — a skill apparently also shared by Buchanan, who was said to have partaken in a gallon of whiskey a week. Truman, for his part, was said to be a fan of that all-American spirit, bourbon. Rumor has it that when vacationing in Key West, he would wake up with a shot of Wild Turkey each day.

Brandy: Ulysses S. Grant

Its pretty well-known that Ulysses S. Grant was a prolific drinker. Even back during his time in the Civil War people knew him as a drinker, but when President Lincoln was told that Grant had been drinking whiskey on the war front, Lincoln was quoted as saying, "Then find out what brand he drinks, and send my other generals a case!"

Martini: Herbert Hoover

Maryse Chevriere

While the tale that Hoover created the first Gibson (that’s a martini with a cocktail onion instead of an olive as a garnish) seems to be more rumor than reality, it is true that the former president was a fan of the classic martini.

Brandy, Scotch, Martini: Franklin D. Roosevelt

It should come as no surprise that FDR, the president responsible for the repeal of Prohibition, was a fan of many spirits and spirited concoctions, including (but most likely not limited to) brandy, scotch, and the ever-classic martini.

Daiquiri: John F. Kennedy

Wikimedia Commons/Mike Fleming

There is some debate about the origin of the Daiquiri, but some scholars say that it originated in Cuba, making it an interesting choice for the Cold War-era president.

Scotch and Soda: Lyndon B. Johnson

LBJ was well known for his affinity for Cutty Sark and soda. His special assistant famously recalled a story from Johnson’s Texas ranch where the president was driving around drinking scotch and soda from a foam cup, and would occasionally stop and hold his drink out the window, cueing a Secret Service agent to run up and refill his drink.

Rum and Coke: Richard Nixon

Here’s a fun little tidbit to chew on: If Nixon ever added a little lime juice to his favorite cocktail, he would have been drinking what is known as a Cuba Libre. Ironic, no? (Apparently he was also a fan of, and quite skilled at mixing, dry martinis.)

Gin and Tonic: Gerald Ford

Snakebite: Bill Clinton

According to reports, the former president is a fan of the Snakebite, a beer cocktail made of equal parts lager and hard cider.


What the ##64! Do I Do with This? Averna: What It Is and How to Use It.

You bought a spirit or liqueur because a cocktail recipe called for a very minute amount. Now you’re stuck with the remaining 9/10ths of the bottle and what to do with it. No worries. Top bartenders weigh in with tips and recipes for getting every last drop out of an underutilized ingredient so it doesn’t gather dust on your bar shelf.

The Italian word amaro may translate to “bitter,” but the booze category by this name is much more multifaceted than the word might imply. Produced by macerating roots, herbs, bark, flowers and/or citrus peels in wine or a neutral spirit like brandy, tweaking the taste with sugar and leaving it to steep and age in cask, amaros by and large are actually bitter and sweet, not to mention packed with nuanced flavor.

The style dates back to the 19th century, when apothecaries bottled proprietary elixirs to treat nausea, indigestion and other digestive ailments. Amaro is still often consumed after a large meal to counter overindulgence, but it’s also imbibed because it’s simply delicious.

Averna is a member of the amaro category, invented by Salvatore Averna in 1868 and produced in Sicily. Viscous and easy on the palate, it’s a kind, gentle style with plenty of versatility in cocktails. You may have grabbed a bottle a few years ago when Black Manhattans were all the rage, but there are plenty of other uses for it.

Meaghan Dorman, the bar director at Dear Irving and The Raines Law Room in New York City, says Averna works on its own as well as in comforting nightcaps—a quality not seen in many amari. “The elements of bitter and candied orange peel shine through as well as pleasant caramel and earthy notes to ground the sweetness,” she says. She recommends balancing its viscosity with acidity or dry elements like sherry.

At The Raines Law Room, the Across the Pacific mixes Averna with lime, orgeat and two kinds of Jamaican rum, served over crushed ice and garnished with a lime wheel and grated nutmeg. Dorman also suggests splitting the amount of sweet vermouth in a Manhattan with Averna. In addition, she says, “I find it has darker botanical notes like sage, rosemary and juniper so it plays well with gin in a more-bitter Martinez riff.”

The liqueur’s herbaceous and bittersweet character leaves room for citrus and a strong booze like rum or whiskey, says Daniel Warrilow, the Italian portfolio ambassador for Campari America, Averna’s parent corporation. He pairs it with lemon soda to make an Averna Limonata.

“To me, Averna has a lot of cola-like qualities with a hint of orange,” says Stacy Swenson, the creative drink specialist at Simple Serve, a spirits, cocktails and strategy team. She makes a simple Averna Highball with sparkling water over ice, garnished with an orange wedge. The spirit’s affinity for egg whites or whole eggs makes Averna a perfect spirit in a Sour, Fizz or Flip, as well as in drinks including coconut, coffee, cream, fresh herbs such as rosemary or thyme, and dried fruits like cherries or figs.

“Use Averna in place of whiskey in classic cocktails for a lower-ABV alternative that still has a bold flavor,” says Swenson. One of her favorite uses is as the base in an Averna Cobbler, along with sweet vermouth, lemon and black cherry marmalade, garnished with mint, blackberries and cracked black pepper. “Like most spirits and bitter things, amaro is an acquired taste,” she says. “If it’s too harsh on its own, try lengthening it with club soda or using it as a modifier.”


How To Make Jamaican Sorrel Drink

Ingredients:

  • water
  • dried sorrel
  • grated fresh ginger
  • allspice berries
  • cloves
  • orange peel
  • simple syrup or maple syrup, to sweeten

Make It:

  1. Boil water in a saucepan.
  2. Add in sorrel, ginger, berries, cloves, and orange peel.
  3. Let mixture steep for about an hour in the pan.
  4. Meanwhile, make the simple syrup (follow my easy recipe below) and set aside.
  5. Strain sorrel juice into a pitcher and sweeten with maple syrup, to taste.
  6. Serve over ice and garnish with orange and lime wedges.

How to Make Simple Sugar Syrup

Making your own simple syrup is quite easy.

Just add 1 cup sugar and 1 cup of water to a saucepan, and cook on low heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. As soon as sugar is dissolved, remove from heat and let it cool.

For a thicker syrup, you can use a 2:1 ratio. Add 2 cups sugar and 1 cup of water to a saucepan, and cook until sugar is dissolved.

If you do make a thicker syrup like this, note that you will need to use less to your cocktail. Spice jars are great for storing leftover syrup.

Recipe Tips

  • This recipe uses dried sorrel. If using fresh hibiscus, the drink will be a lighter red.
  • For a deeper red color, add a few more tablespoons of sorrel.
  • When entertaining a crowd, simply double (or even triple) this recipe.
  • Prep it ahead of time and just store in the fridge until needed.
  • Use a sharp knife to cut off the peel from an orange if you need to.

Delicious Variations

  • Make it into a punch – spike it with rum for a delicious adults-only version.
  • Add fruit – colourful fruit slices will add to the festive look.
  • Vary the sweetener – feel free to sweeten with maple syrup or honey.

Storage

Refrigerate in an airtight container and store for up to 1 week.


The 7 essential cocktails every drinker should know how to make

Since the beginning of the craft cocktail renaissance, we’ve been gifted (and occasionally cursed) with a massive creative explosion of new drinks. Good drinks, bad drinks, a few great drinks. New classics that spread around the globe, and drinks doomed to be forgotten because they were mediocre, or too complicated to catch on, or required ingredients we could source only at the top of a particular mountaintop in Sweden, or simply because — holy gin fizz, Batman! — there are so many drinks now that it’s impossible to keep track of all of them unless you’re some kind of maniacal bartending robot from space.

I want to be clear: I love the creativity of this industry. As a customer, it’s still my favorite thing about going into a new bar: that moment of perusing a menu, reading the ingredients of a drink, assembling it in my mind-palate (to borrow from Sherlock) and thinking, “Wow, that sounds great.” And when I order it, about 10 percent of the time it is great. Thirty percent of the time it’s at least pretty good. Then there’s the other 60 percent of the time, when the drink turns out to be out of balance, unpleasant or muddy, or when all the advertised flavors don’t show up in the drink’s flavor at all, causing the ingredients list to read as the cocktail equivalent of used car salesmanship: big talk, nothing under the hood.

But this is not a rant against making new drinks — only a plea to get to know the classics first, to understand the rules before attempting to shatter them. There are bartenders whose weirdness I trust, whose raspberry-dill-sherry fizz, or fat-washed cold-brew and slivovitz Old-Fashioned, or yuzu and pickle juice sour I will try without hesitation. Those bartenders are, without exception, the same bartenders I am utterly confident can make me a perfect daiquiri.

I trust their creativity because I trust their foundations. They have mastered the drinks that have survived for decades — some for centuries — and know them inside and out. These are bartenders whose ambition is tempered by, even defined by, humility, who love exploring good spirits and liqueurs, and who have, on occasion, come up with a drink that deserves to be made and remade and shared widely. But do they believe that their new drinks are more important than a Manhattan? No, they do not. And neither do I, and neither should you. (I could be wrong, of course, and if your fancy new drink is still on cocktail menus around the world 100 years from now, come visit my floating head in its cryogenic chamber, and I’ll revise my opinion accordingly.)


Why the Mint Julep Is the Official Drink of the Kentucky Derby

As horses toe the start line at Churchill Downs May 1, 2021, they'll be racing again in front of fans, albeit at 50 percent capacity. That's still a lot of fans — Churchill Downs can hold 165,000 people. But fans in those stands is a good thing, considering the 2020 Kentucky Derby was delayed until September, and ran for the first time ever with no fans at all because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

But some things will never change about Derby Day, and that includes traditions like big hats and cocktails, specifically the mint julep.

This Churchill Downs staple — a cocktail with bourbon, fresh mint, ice, sugar and water — has been the Kentucky Derby's official drink since 1938, but experts believe its history here goes well beyond the '30s. Churchill Downs representative Sara Brown Meehan told Good Morning America that some say racetrack officials planted mint for the cocktail as early as 1875, when the famed race began.

A Mint Julep History

Mint juleps are as synonymous with the Kentucky Derby as oversized hats, but these cocktails actually originated more than 400 miles (643 kilometers) away. Virginia is credited with spearheading the mint julep movement. The first account dates back to 1803, when Englishman John Davis defined it as "a dram of spirituous liquor that has mint in it, taken by Virginians of a morning," in his book "Travels of Four and a Half Years in the United States of America."

At that time, the bourbon wasn't the spirit of choice. In fact, any spirit would do. It wasn't until the 1770s when Virginians moved west — taking the mint julep with them — that Kentucky added a signature twist to the cocktail: bourbon. Virginians used rum and brandy in their mint juleps, but Henry Clay, a Kentucky senator in the early 1800s, introduced bourbon, Kentucky's renowned spirit, as the base.

As a beloved Kentucky drink, the mint julep slowly seeped its way into Derby culture. Records even show broadcasters lamenting the lack of the drink during Prohibition from 1920 to 1933.

The Signature Silver Cup

In Kentucky Derby culture, the julep cup is just as important as the cocktail itself. These sleek sterling silver cups predate the derby. The cups date back to the 1800s when early Kentucky silversmiths from Lexington and Louisville debuted the design.

"It was a popular gift for christenings, weddings or a graduation," Natalia Cardenas, brand ambassador for the derby's official bourbon, Woodford Reserve, says in an email. "Records dating back to the 1800s show that julep cups were being given out as prizes at the county fair."

Race officials used julep cups as trophies for first-place jockeys in the 1820s. The signature design, known for a wide-footed base and either a beaded rim or bands at the top, is more than just decorative. "It is meant to be held only by touching the top or the bottom, allowing the silver to frost over," Cardenas says.

Since its inception, the julep cup has taken many forms. In 2008, Churchill Downs debuted the largest mint julep glass in the world: a 6-foot-tall (1.8-meter) cup with a 206 gallon (779-liter) capacity that's the equivalent of 5,000 mint juleps. Woodford Reserve and Tiffany & Co. also auctioned off three luxe julep cups in 2011. The cups, which started at $2,000, boasted 24-karat-gold bases that the high-end jeweler used for horse racing trophies in 1876. The Derby typically serves its juleps in glass souvenir cups, though.

Make a Mean Mint Julep

They may be best served in sterling silver cups, but crafting a mint julep at home doesn't have to be daunting. Cardenas gave us her recipe for making a Woodford Reserve mint julep:

  • 5 to 8 fresh mint leaves
  • 0.5 ounce simple syrup
  • crushed ice
  • 2 ounces of Woodford Reserve Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey
  1. Lightly muddle the mint and simple syrup in your mint julep cup.
  2. Add the bourbon and pack tightly with crushed ice.
  3. Stir until the cup is frosted on the outside.
  4. Top with more crushed ice to form an ice dome and garnish with a mint sprig.

Cardenas recommends Woodford Reserve Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey because its flavor is powerful enough to stand up to the ingredients, and at 90.4 proof, it can last for a handful of races. "Be sure not to over-muddle the mint, as it tends to make the drink bitter," Cardenas says. "Make sure your simple syrup is equal parts sugar to water, and crushed ice is best because it dilutes and chills the cocktail the fastest." To make crushed ice at home, Cardenas says just wrap up a few ice cubes in a clean dish towel and crush it with a rolling pin or kitchen mallet.

Molly Wellmann, a renowned mixologist in Cincinnati, says she looks for bourbon that creates a well-balanced drink for her mint juleps. "Old Forester is an excellent choice because it isn't too spicy and the corn shows through," she says in an email. "I wouldn't recommend using a high-rye bourbon." Wellmann also tops her juleps with a splash of dark rum for creativity. "It's a throwback to when the spirit of choice was rum, and it really brings out the caramel and vanilla notes."

The history of horses and bourbon goes well beyond the derby. Before the Civil War, horse farmers simultaneously bred horses, grew crops and ran their own small distilleries. Prohibition ended the longstanding relationship between horse breeding and distilleries. By the time it was repealed, large conglomerates had scooped up nearly all of Kentucky's private distilleries.


White House Chefs Share What It's Like To Cook For The President

The White House kitchen isn’t like any other kitchen in America. As a matter of fact, there are many kitchens inside the historic building. Ever wonder what it’s like to cook in one of those kitchens?

We spoke to three people who have first-hand experience cooking in the White House and asked them what it’s like to prepare meals for the most powerful people in the world and their families.

White House chefs come from military (and restaurant) backgrounds.

Two types of chefs work in the White House: those from the military and those from the restaurant world.

“The military chefs are often Navy/Coast Guard, but there’s also a few from the Army and Air Force,” said Bill Yosses , a restaurant owner and former pastry chef at the White House from 2006-2014.

Yosses was never in the military. He made a name for himself on the New York restaurant scene, and his life changed when he got a call from the White House asking him to bake for George W. Bush and the first family in 2006.

He loved his time there, which lasted through much of Barack Obama’s tenure, and had nothing but good things to say about his former coworkers. They’re very much unsung heroes in America,” he said of the residence’s staff, which includes carpenters and plumbers. “Many of them have been there for decades. They’re devoted public servants.”

Chef Andre Rush is a motivational speaker and Army veteran who gained national attention from a photo of him (and his biceps) grilling on White House grounds. His White House tenure began in 1997 when, through one of his mentors in the military, he had the opportunity to cook for Bill Clinton and he seized it. He’s cooked on and off in White House kitchens until as recently as 2018. “Once I got in, everything was up to me,” he said. “I had to perform and do well. It also didn’t hurt that I already had a top-secret security clearance.”

Chef Marti Mongiello , owner of the U.S. Presidential Culinary Museum and a Navy veteran, cooked at the White House during a three-year tour from 1993-1996, during Clinton’s first term. “I lived on top of the mountain at the Camp David retreat,” he said. “I had a sweet, pleasant gig living there. And I’d come down to the White House for state dinners and other events.”

How everyone in the White House gets fed

It’s tempting to think of the White House as simply a place where the first family lives and eats, but it’s way more than just a residence.

“The Oval Office is in the West Wing, and the kitchen serves lunch to the president, the Cabinet members and their guests,” Yosses said. “It’s a room called the Navy Mess, and it fits about 60 people. It’s different from the residence.”

The residence ― known as the executive mansion ― is where Yosses baked his delicacies, and where an executive chef, a sous chef, a kitchen steward and two pastry team members are responsible for breakfast, lunch and dinner for the first family and guests. He said presidents typically take lunch in the Oval Office during the week.

If folks in the White House get hungry after-hours, it’s strangely not common for them to ask the hardworking chefs to whip up something. “I was there for eight years and that did not occur,” Yosses said. “There were no overnight snacks. In theory, we were working 24/7. There could be a national emergency and the people involved have to get up at 3 a.m. and handle a crisis. The crises happened, but they weren’t hungry.”

Celeb-filled state dinners and heavy security are just part of the job

“It’s like being a hotel chef, a private chef and a restaurant chef all in one,” Yosses said. “You’re cooking breakfast, lunch and dinner for a private family. You could be doing a fine dining tasting menu with 5-6 courses, or you might have so many people coming through it’s like being a banquet chef in a hotel.”

One of those events is the state dinner, where visiting foreign leaders join American politicians (and celebrities) to honor the two countries’ diplomatic ties.

“The dinners are a lot of pressure ― we can have 10 people doing one little course,” said Rush. “We’d rather have too many people than not enough. We have a flood of people come in to make sure every avenue is taken care of.”

Mongiello, who is Italian-American, spoke fondly of helping prepare the Italian state dinner during his time at the White House in the late ’90s, cooking for guests that included the president of Italy, Sophia Loren and

Security is always of utmost importance, whether a state dinner is happening or not. Mongiello said his friend, chef Michael Lomonaco, was preparing a dinner at the White House and got to see a fraction of it firsthand.

“He said to me, ‘I’ve never seen people with machine guns, rocket launchers and this kind of hardware.’ I told him, ‘Michael, honestly, this is not everything that’s available. This is just what you’re allowed to see here,’” he said.

The foods Presidents and their families love to eat

Yosses worked as the pastry chef for the Bush and Obama families, both of whom were huge fans of his pies. “The Obamas loved pie of every kind,” he said. “Fruit pie in the summer, banana cream pie, Boston cream pie, that’s what they loved. President Bush has a sweet tooth, and liked so many different things. But he liked the pies, too.”

Yosses used his French training in pastry to make just about every delicious pastry under the sun. “If it had a dessert name, we made it,” he said. “Chocolate bonbons, petit fours, layer cakes, chiffon cakes, ice cream, you name it.”

And because the White House should feel like home to a president, it’s no wonder the staff bends over backward to make sure they’re eating what they want.

“One of the Clintons’ favorite foods was sweet pickled watermelon rind,” Mongiello said. “And it had to be a very specific brand from the store: Old South.”

Just like in any restaurant, the customer is always right. Mongiello managed to track some down. “Let me go out and buy that because it makes them happy!” he said.


This Simple Tinto de Verano Recipe is the Best Way to Drink Like a Spaniard

While celebrating my high school graduation last summer in Spain, I found the drink of my dreams: tinto de verano. Think red wine and citrus soda (i.e. San Pellegrino aranciata, aranciata rossa or limonata). Sounds amazing, right?

Upon returning from our fabulous Spanish adventure, my mother, foodie extraordinaire, combined all sorts of Spanish wines and citrus sodas until she found the perfect concoction that could bring us back to our favorite cafés in Barcelona and Madrid. Yes, you should be very excited about this recipe.


For Election Day, Drink Like A President

Hey, America how are your nerves today? If you’re on edge, you’re not alone.

Last month The American Psychological Association reported 77% of Americans say the future of the nation is a significant source of stress, with anxiety over the current political climate a major stressor (68%). Those numbers are up by 11 and 6 percentage points over 2016.

It’s too bad the APA didn’t survey American’s drinking habits leading up to the election. What a trove of data that might yield!

But, just in time for Election Day, someone did survey the drinking habits of presidents. It’s not exactly new ground—volumes have been written about our Colonial oenophiles-in-chief, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, who kept record of their purchases and penchants. But to date, no one has tackled such a comprehensive volume as Wine and the White House: A History, by Frederick J. Ryan Jr., and published last month by the White House Historical Association. The author is one of the consummate Washington insiders: chairman of the board of the WHHA, which provided many of the images, and publisher/CEO of the Washington Post.

What else is new: specially commissioned new photography of the White House glassware collection, published here for the first time. Objects and ephemera from Ryan’s personal collection are also included, making this truly a first in the annals of presidential drinking books. The author spent two years researching and writing the coffee-table-worthy book.

Weighing in at just over five pounds, Wine and the White House begins with George Washington (a Madeira fan) and ends with Donald J. Trump (himself a nondrinker, but whose state dinners featured America-first selections).

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Thomas Jefferson's "Wines Provided at Washington"

Not surprisingly, pages devoted to the well-traveled Jefferson, who served as a foreign diplomat, make for the most interesting biography. His preferences were diverse—even exotic—for the times, with orders for wines from Hungary (Tokay), Italy, Spain and Portugal. He was also a spendthrift, spending $3,200 annually, equivalent to $70,124 in 2020. Jefferson detailed his purchases, and Ryan includes a couple of pages of his notes (above), which, if you can decipher, make for fascinating reading. He also summarizes the famous Hardy Rodenstock scandal in the 1980s over the sale of Château Lafite bottles with purported Jeffersonian provenance. (What other president can make the news some 154 after his death?)

The presidential wine biographies are only a portion of the book, which includes descriptions of selections and service by various White House wine stewards and social secretaries and the evolution of preferences from storied French vineyards and other European regions to the California upstarts—the latter are now legends in their own rights. With contributions from wine royalty such as Robert Mondavi, Pierre Lurton, Philippe Sereys de Rothschild and Katharina Prüm, the book serves somewhat like a “Who’s Who” of wine. But it’s also inclusive of the up-and-coming, such as Jean Case of Early Mountain Vineyards in Madison, Va.

Vermeil Wine Ewer from 1817 used during the Eisenhower administration and a program for the visit . [+] of King George VI hosted by Franklin D. Roosevelt, June 1939

White House Historical Association

For those interested in decorative arts, the chapter on the White House service collection is pleasurable eye candy: extravagant pitchers, historic etched stemware, decanters and coolers (guess they didn’t call them buckets). The chapter devoted to presidential toasts is less inspiring, but if he wins re-election, Trump would find some good fodder here in case he wants to make nice with some world leaders.

The menu section more than makes up for the speeches: Indeed, this is my favorite part of the book. The earliest menu dates from an 1877 dinner hosted by President Rutherford Hayes and is current through fall 2019 with the Trumps. Reading descriptions of the dishes not only worked my salivatory glands, but provided a history of fashionable dishes, available ingredients and customs at various times of war and other significant national events (for example, during the Depression, dinner cards weren’t printed so as to conserve paper). In addition to the fancy printed menus, typewritten drafts contain hand written notes on the wines, services and seating, showing, perhaps, the whims of visiting dignitaries. One can imagine!

Drafts of the menus for State Dinners show the meticulous detail and sometime humorous notations.

L-R: Harry S. Truman Presidential Library Library of Congress John F. Kennedy Presidential Library

There are some fun nuggets here: Legendary social secretary to Jacqueline Kennedy Letitia Baldridge writes a reprimand about serving rosé wine with fish—“totally inappropriate” she typed—and I was tickled to find a menu for a Truman-hosted dinner served on the same date as my birthday. Predating me by a decade, the Trumans entertained the Prime Minister of Italy with boozy cocktails and sparkling Burgundy. And the typography is fun to look at, too, paralleling trends in fonts (calligraphy a popular choice for several presidencies). Not surprisingly, menus from the Trump era feature elaborate scrolls, swirls and serifs.

The final chapter catalogs the vintages of all wines served. Here too, you can see the evolution of tastes, the rise and fall in popularity of regions and styles, and who liked what.

In addition to his own collection Ryan sources illustrations from the White House archives and other government sources, supplemented by historic images from photo agencies and private collections.

It’s a fun bipartisan read for the times. And without no debate: we could all use that.

Published by the White House Historical Association and available online at the WHHA shop $55


In Summary

Chilean drinks are as unique and diverse as the food you’ll find throughout the country. Some of the typical drinks in Chile you’ll see everywhere, while others you may need to dig for.

By seeking out these 6 famous Chile drinks, you will elevate your experience from being a tourist to being a local. Immerse yourself in the local Chilean food and drinks culture.

However, if you are going to try all of these Chile drinks, you’ll need some Chilean food to keep you going.

Be sure to check out our article about the 10 popular Chilean dishes worth trying.

Eat and drink like a local in Chile and savor your local and authentic food experiences.


How to Make All Your Favorite Starbucks Drinks at Home

Copycat recipes are beloved for many reasons, including saving you a few bucks. These Starbucks copycat recipes are no exception, and are just what you need right now (even if you’re not on lockdown any longer, you’re probably not going out for coffee like you used to).

I’ll admit it: I love Starbucks, but I’m ballin’ on a budget, so I don’t always have Starbucks money. Feel me? You may not want to admit it, but you probably feel me. It happens to the best of us. But I have a solution. I’m here to help you become your own barista, and pretty soon you’ll be able to make some of the most classic Starbucks drinks—hot OR iced—from the comfort of your own home!

And if you buy all the ingredients up front, you’ll probably save money on coffee in the long run, which is a huge plus.

Coronavirus caveat: If you don’t already have some of the special syrups mentioned below at home, expect shipping delays when you order online—or DIY those too. Try this vanilla syrup recipe (don’t stress if you only have extract, but add a little extra), and this homemade caramel syrup recipe, and you’ll be all set.

Pumpkin Spice Latte

The fall-time favorite that I admittedly have still never tried(!) has quickly become synonymous with the Starbucks name, so I’d be certifiably insane to not teach you how to make it at home. That way, you could start every day with a PSL. As a bonus, Chowhound’s DIY Homemade Pumpkin Spice Latte recipe has way less sugar than the original and can even be made vegan if you want! You’re so welcome.

For the latte itself, you’ll want to start by heating your milk for one minute and then frothing it a bit if you don’t have a handheld frother, never fear. Here’s how to froth milk without an espresso machine (or an electric frother, for that matter). For the full PSL effect, be sure to top with whipped cream and some pumpkin pie spice.

Zyliss Handheld Milk Frother, $10 from Sur La Table

Another way to whip up some foam at home.

Caramel Frappuccino

This is the perfect drink for a hot day (or a cheat day), and it’s the drink that got me hooked on Starbucks years before I discovered my need for pure shots of bitter espresso straight into my bloodstream. And this Caramel Frappuccino recipe was actually featured on Good Morning America, so you know it’s a good copycat! You can use espresso shots or strongly brewed coffee, and any milk you like. You’ll also need both caramel sauce and caramel syrup, but the xanthan gum is optional (it’s there to thicken things up for the ideal frappe kind of texture, but adding more ice works just as well).

Torani Syrup Variety Pack, 4 for $30.30 from Amazon

Caramel, vanilla, French vanilla, and hazelnut syrups for recreating all your faves.

Because you’re the barista, feel free to get even more generous with the caramel. For authenticity, top it off with some whipped cream and a little caramel sauce drizzle.

Cold Brew with Salted Cream Cold Foam

A more restrained but equally refreshing option that still satisfies the craving for a little something sweet (and salty), this simple cold brew with creamy, salted sweet foam is perfect. This copycat salted cream cold foam cold brew recipe promises everything you love about the drink, except the instant gratification part, since you’ll need to steep your cold brew for about 18 hours.

White Chocolate Mocha

This is actually one of Starbucks’ most popular drinks. It’s my go-to when I’m craving something very sweet, and it’s the everyday order of none other than Kim Kardashian West. Celebrities, they’re just like us. Now, this White Chocolate Mocha recipe calls for about 3 tablespoons of white chocolate chips rather than syrup, but if you like it much sweeter, just add more chocolate! Make sure to whisk often when heating your coffee, milk, and chocolate, and don’t skip the whipped cream and chocolate shavings on top.

Vanilla Latte

Hot or iced, the Starbucks vanilla latte is my thing. It’s so simple, yet so delicious. It’s even perfect with any kind of milk—regular, soy, coconut, you name it! And this one is so easy, you don’t even need a recipe. Froth your favorite milk with a whisk or blender, add your preferred espresso or strong coffee, and pick up some vanilla syrup from your local grocery store. When summer comes around again, I strongly suggest making this over some ice.

Iced Caramel Macchiato

Perhaps the most Instagram-worthy drink on this list, the iced caramel macchiato looks difficult because the espresso is so beautifully layered on the milk, but I promise it’s super simple, thanks to this Iced Caramel Macchiato recipe.

You’ll need to get vanilla syrup and caramel syrup too (if you want things sweeter), plus some some caramel sauce for the bottom of your cup (OK, and the top). When pouring in your espresso, go slowly and the coffee will layer naturally on top of the milk. I know a lot of people choose to mix that until they blend, but I actually enjoy it separated.

Passion Tea Lemonade

In what is perhaps the most basic thing in the world, I stop in a Starbucks drive through once a week every summer on the way to beach volleyball for one of these things. The passion tea lemonade is as addicting as it is delicious, and I think it’s just as good unsweetened.

For this Copycat Starbucks Passion Tea Lemonade recipe, you’ll need the straight up passion tea that Starbucks makes. But good news, they sell it in stores and in bulk online! You’ll need to boil water and steep the tea first and foremost, because tea just doesn’t dissolve to its fullest in cold water. You’ll also need to add the sugar in now (if you so choose) for the same reason it’ll dissolve much better in hot tea. When you’ve boiled water and you’re satisfied with your tea, refrigerate it for a little while. When it’s ready, fill your cup with ice. The recommended ratio for the passion tea lemonade is one part tea, two parts lemonade. That way it’ll be naturally sweet.


For Election Day, Drink Like A President

Hey, America how are your nerves today? If you’re on edge, you’re not alone.

Last month The American Psychological Association reported 77% of Americans say the future of the nation is a significant source of stress, with anxiety over the current political climate a major stressor (68%). Those numbers are up by 11 and 6 percentage points over 2016.

It’s too bad the APA didn’t survey American’s drinking habits leading up to the election. What a trove of data that might yield!

But, just in time for Election Day, someone did survey the drinking habits of presidents. It’s not exactly new ground—volumes have been written about our Colonial oenophiles-in-chief, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, who kept record of their purchases and penchants. But to date, no one has tackled such a comprehensive volume as Wine and the White House: A History, by Frederick J. Ryan Jr., and published last month by the White House Historical Association. The author is one of the consummate Washington insiders: chairman of the board of the WHHA, which provided many of the images, and publisher/CEO of the Washington Post.

What else is new: specially commissioned new photography of the White House glassware collection, published here for the first time. Objects and ephemera from Ryan’s personal collection are also included, making this truly a first in the annals of presidential drinking books. The author spent two years researching and writing the coffee-table-worthy book.

Weighing in at just over five pounds, Wine and the White House begins with George Washington (a Madeira fan) and ends with Donald J. Trump (himself a nondrinker, but whose state dinners featured America-first selections).

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Thomas Jefferson's "Wines Provided at Washington"

Not surprisingly, pages devoted to the well-traveled Jefferson, who served as a foreign diplomat, make for the most interesting biography. His preferences were diverse—even exotic—for the times, with orders for wines from Hungary (Tokay), Italy, Spain and Portugal. He was also a spendthrift, spending $3,200 annually, equivalent to $70,124 in 2020. Jefferson detailed his purchases, and Ryan includes a couple of pages of his notes (above), which, if you can decipher, make for fascinating reading. He also summarizes the famous Hardy Rodenstock scandal in the 1980s over the sale of Château Lafite bottles with purported Jeffersonian provenance. (What other president can make the news some 154 after his death?)

The presidential wine biographies are only a portion of the book, which includes descriptions of selections and service by various White House wine stewards and social secretaries and the evolution of preferences from storied French vineyards and other European regions to the California upstarts—the latter are now legends in their own rights. With contributions from wine royalty such as Robert Mondavi, Pierre Lurton, Philippe Sereys de Rothschild and Katharina Prüm, the book serves somewhat like a “Who’s Who” of wine. But it’s also inclusive of the up-and-coming, such as Jean Case of Early Mountain Vineyards in Madison, Va.

Vermeil Wine Ewer from 1817 used during the Eisenhower administration and a program for the visit . [+] of King George VI hosted by Franklin D. Roosevelt, June 1939

White House Historical Association

For those interested in decorative arts, the chapter on the White House service collection is pleasurable eye candy: extravagant pitchers, historic etched stemware, decanters and coolers (guess they didn’t call them buckets). The chapter devoted to presidential toasts is less inspiring, but if he wins re-election, Trump would find some good fodder here in case he wants to make nice with some world leaders.

The menu section more than makes up for the speeches: Indeed, this is my favorite part of the book. The earliest menu dates from an 1877 dinner hosted by President Rutherford Hayes and is current through fall 2019 with the Trumps. Reading descriptions of the dishes not only worked my salivatory glands, but provided a history of fashionable dishes, available ingredients and customs at various times of war and other significant national events (for example, during the Depression, dinner cards weren’t printed so as to conserve paper). In addition to the fancy printed menus, typewritten drafts contain hand written notes on the wines, services and seating, showing, perhaps, the whims of visiting dignitaries. One can imagine!

Drafts of the menus for State Dinners show the meticulous detail and sometime humorous notations.

L-R: Harry S. Truman Presidential Library Library of Congress John F. Kennedy Presidential Library

There are some fun nuggets here: Legendary social secretary to Jacqueline Kennedy Letitia Baldridge writes a reprimand about serving rosé wine with fish—“totally inappropriate” she typed—and I was tickled to find a menu for a Truman-hosted dinner served on the same date as my birthday. Predating me by a decade, the Trumans entertained the Prime Minister of Italy with boozy cocktails and sparkling Burgundy. And the typography is fun to look at, too, paralleling trends in fonts (calligraphy a popular choice for several presidencies). Not surprisingly, menus from the Trump era feature elaborate scrolls, swirls and serifs.

The final chapter catalogs the vintages of all wines served. Here too, you can see the evolution of tastes, the rise and fall in popularity of regions and styles, and who liked what.

In addition to his own collection Ryan sources illustrations from the White House archives and other government sources, supplemented by historic images from photo agencies and private collections.

It’s a fun bipartisan read for the times. And without no debate: we could all use that.

Published by the White House Historical Association and available online at the WHHA shop $55



Comments:

  1. Fitch

    I'm already taking it! Super!

  2. Zulkicage

    Everything goes like clockwork.

  3. Izaak

    It seems to me, what is it it was already discussed.

  4. Royall

    What's the phrase ... Super, brilliant idea



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